Our Services

General Ultrasound

Abdominal ultrasound is an type of imaging test. It is used to examine organs in the abdomen including the liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, and kidneys. The blood vessels that lead to some of these organs can also be looked at with ultrasound.

How the Test is Performed

An ultrasound machine makes images of organs and structures inside the body. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves that reflect off body structures. A computer receives these waves and uses them to create a picture.

You will be lying down for the procedure. A clear, water-based conducting gel is applied to the skin over the abdomen. This helps with the transmission of the sound waves. A handheld probe called a transducer is then moved over the abdomen.

You may need to change position so that the health care provider can look at different areas. You may also need to hold your breath for short periods during the exam.
Most of the time, the test takes less than 30 minutes.

How to Prepare for the Test

Preparation steps vary depending on the problem. Most of the time, people are asked not to eat or drink for six hours before the exam. Your sonographer will go over what you need to do.

How the Test Will Feel
There is little discomfort. The conducting gel may feel a little cold and wet.

Why the Test is Performed
You may have this test to:

  • Find the cause of abdominal pain
  • Find the cause of kidney infections
  • Diagnose and monitor tumors and cancers
  • Diagnose or treat ascites
  • Learn why there is swelling of an abdominal organ
  • Look for damage after an injury
  • Look for stones in the gallbladder or kidney
  • Look for the cause of abnormal blood tests such as liver function tests or kidney tests
  • Look for the cause of a fever
  • The reason for the test will depend on your symptoms

An abdominal ultrasound can indicate conditions such as:

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
  • Abscess
  • Appendicitis
  • Cholecystitis
  • Gallstones
  • Hydronephrosis
  • Kidney stones
  • Pancreatitis (inflammation in pancreas)
  • Spleen enlargement (splenomegaly)
  • Risks

There is no known risk. You are not exposed to ionizing radiation.

These examinations are bulk billed for Medicare card holders. All referrals accepted. 

Use of renal tract ultrasound:

Ultrasound is a very good method for investigating a wide range of renal tract abnormalities. Abnormalities that can be visualised include some structural abnormalities, size differences, hydronephrosis, renal parenchymal abnormalities, scarring, renal masses and renal cysts. Use of colour Doppler scanning means the renal vessels can also be examined – a specialist procedure only.

Specific indications:

  • Renal colic: Ultrasound offers an alternative, particularly in pregnancy or repeated investigations in a young person where radiation dose is a potential concern.
  • Urinary infection: Where imaging is clinically indicated (such as in recurrent upper UTIs or adult males) Ultrasound can be useful to show renal size, scarring, collecting system dilatation, residual bladder volume and to assess for complications such as obstruction or renal / peri-renal abscesses. Ultrasound is the first line investigation for UTI in children (a micturating cystogram is probably also necessary).
  • Haematuria: Ultrasound is the first line investigation in haematuria that relates to probable renal parenchymal disease (such as acute renal failure).
  • Renal masses: Ultrasound can assess if a solid vs cystic , the vascularity of the mass or collecting system dilatation.
  • Renal failure: Use ultrasound to exclude obstruction; assess renal size (bilateral small kidneys may suggest irreversible disease); check for calculi or polycystic kidney disease.

Prostatic enlargement: Ultrasound can assess the -size of the prostate and the bladder residual volume.

Advantages of renal ultrasound:

  • Painless and non-invasive.Does not involve exposure to radiation.
  • Requires little preparation.

Disadvantages of renal ultrasound:

  • The nature of ultrasound images means the renal tract urothelium detail is limited.
  • The image quality may be reduced by obesity, overlying bowel gas or inability of the patient to co-operate with positional and breath holding instructions.
  • If vesicoureteral reflux is the concern, it is better to perform a micturating cystourethrogram.

Patient Information

This examination provides images of your kidneys and bladder.

It can be used to:

  • detect a mass, cyst, kidney stone, or obstruction to the flow of urine; or
    determine kidney size and shape.
  • The scan is safe and painless and no ionising radiation is involved.

How it works
A transducer passed over your kidneys emits sound waves that, like sonar, bounce off your kidney, transmitting a picture of the organ which is then displayed on a video screen.

Preparation:
There is no preparation necessary for this examination, although a full bladder is usually required prior to the scan.

Medications can be taken prior to the scan.

The procedure:

  • The procedure usually takes about 30 minutes.
  • In order to obtain quality images, a water-soluble gel is placed on your skin to act as a medium for the transducer.
  • The transducer is a device which is placed over the abdominal area and moved back and forth to obtain the images necessary to answer your physician’s questions.
  • Positioning may cause some minor discomfort, as may coolness of room or equipment.
  • Possible problems; in very obese people, the outline of the kidneys may be obscured by fatty tissue. Similar problems can be encountered by bowel gas obscuring the kidneys.

These examinations are bulk billed for Medicare card holders, and all referrals are accepted. 

A thyroid ultrasound is an imaging method used to see the thyroid — a gland in the neck that regulates metabolism.

How the Test is Performed

Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the body. The test is usually done in the ultrasound or radiology department.

You will lie with your neck extended beyond its usual limit (hyperextended). The ultrasound technician will place a gel onto your neck. Next, the technician will move a transducer, over the area.

The transducer gives off sound waves. The sound waves go through the body and bounce off the area being studied (in this case, the thyroid gland). A computer looks at the pattern that the sound waves create when bouncing back, and creates an image..

How to Prepare for the Test
No special preparation is necessary for this test.

How the Test Will Feel
You should feel very little discomfort with this test. The gel may be cold.

Why the Test is Performed

A thyroid ultrasound is usually done when you have a growth on your thyroid gland. The exam can help tell the difference between a sac containing fluid (cyst) and abnormal tissue that may or may not be cancerous (a tumor).

Additional conditions under which the test may be performed include the following:

  • Colloid nodular goitre
  • Medullary carcinoma of thyroid
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II
  • Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid
  • Thyroid cancer
  • There are no documented risks of ultrasound.

These examinations are bulk billed for Medicare card holders and all referrals are accepted.

A Testicular Ultrasound Scan may be requested by your doctor in the event of a swelling or pain in the scrotum or testicle. An Ultrasound Scan is a method of obtaining images of almost any part of the body. It works on the principle of reflection of high-frequency sound waves at interfaces between tissues of different density. It does not use any radiation and is therefore safe.

How the Test is Performed

Ultrasound scanning is performed by a specifically trained Sonographer, who uses the ultrasound machine to obtain images on a screen, usually in black and white. These images are stored electronically and can be printed out for viewing, but most of the information is gained by an experienced sonographer during the actual examination.

A special gel is applied to the scrotum, to form an acoustic interface with the ultrasound probe. The gel may be cold but is otherwise harmless. Mild pressure of the probe during the examination can be uncomfortable, if the area being examined is tender.

You will be required to undress and change into a light gown before the procedure.

Medical Conditions and Symptoms

Testicular Ultrasound may be requested in the setting of a painless lump in the scrotum or testicle, to exclude a cyst or tumour. A scrotal or testicular swelling should always be taken seriously.

A painful testicle may be due to infection or inflammation in part of the testis known as the epididymis. This is called epididymitis or epididymo-orchitis and may be acquired via the bloodstream or as a sexually-transmitted infection. It may cause urinary frequency or burning or stinging when passing urine, called dysuria.

Testicular torsion, literally a twisting of the testis on its own cord, is a very serious problem causing pain and tenderness in the testicle of relatively sudden onset, often accompanied by nausea or vomiting. Torsion of the testis is an emergency requiring an operation to “un-twist” the testicle, the time to surgery is critical because the testis may die due to lack of blood supply, within a few hours. Usually if the Emergency Physician or Urologist thinks that testicular torsion is quite likely, the patient would go directly to the operating theatre as an emergency, rather than performing an Ultrasound Scan, which may delay time-critical treatment.

Test Results Explained

The Testicular Ultrasound Scan aims to determine whether a swelling is solid or fluid-filled – a cyst. The scan appearances may be suggestive of a cause for the swelling, but sometimes the ultrasound is used to guide a biopsy of a swelling or lump: a fine needle is inserted and a small amount of fluid or tissue removed for analysis.

In painful conditions of the testicle, the main aim is to determine whether the blood supply to the testis is normal. Increased blood flow is suggestive of epididymitis, while decreased blood flow would be much more serious and may indicate a testicular torsion.

These examinations are bulk billed for Medicare card holders and all referrals are accepted.

If you think that you may have deep vein thrombosis (DVT), see your GP as soon as possible.

Your GP will ask you about your medical history and your symptoms. However, it can be difficult to diagnose DVT from symptoms alone, so your GP may recommend one of the following tests:

D-dimer test
A specialised blood test known as the D-dimer test is used to detect pieces of blood clot that have been broken down and are loose in your bloodstream. The larger the number of fragments found, the more likely it is that you have a blood clot in your vein.
However, the D-dimer test is not always reliable. Blood clot fragments can increase after an operation or injury, or if there is inflammation in your body (when your immune system reacts to an infection or disease). This means that additional tests, such as an ultrasound scan, need to be performed to confirm DVT.
If the D-dimer test is negative, it rules out the possibility of a DVT in up to 97% of cases.

Ultrasound scan
An ultrasound scan can be used to detect clots in your veins. A special type of ultrasound known as a Doppler ultrasound can also be used to find out how fast the blood is flowing through a blood vessel. This helps doctors identify when blood flow is slowed or blocked, which could be caused by a blood clot.

These examinations are bulk billed for Medicare card holders, and all referrals are accepted. These appointments are urgent in nature, so we would try and accommodate to have you in for this scan as soon as possible. 

Subcutaneous Mass looks for lumps in any part of the body

How the Test is Performed
Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the body. For lumps in your neck you will lie with your neck extended beyond its usual limit (hyperextended). The ultrasound technician will place a gel onto your neck. Next, the technician will move a transducer, over the area.
The transducer gives off sound waves. The sound waves go through the body and bounce off the area being studied (in this case, the thyroid gland). A computer looks at the pattern that the sound waves create when bouncing back, and creates an image.

How to Prepare for the Test
No special preparation is necessary for this test.

How the Test Will Feel
You should feel very little discomfort with this test. The gel may be cold.

Why the Test is Performed

Lymph Nodes
An enlarged cervical lymph node is the most commonly encountered neck lump. The role of ultrasound is to differentiate pathological nodes (e.g., metastases, lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenitis) from normal/reactive nodes. Different ultrasound criteria have been established to differentiate benign from malignant cervical lymph nodes. 3 No single criterion is an absolute indicator for predicting malignant nodal disease, and all known ultrasound criteria should be applied together. These signs may point to a specific diagnosis or help determine which lymph node to sample using ultrasound-guided FNAC.

Size alone is a poor criterion. Among the various measurement parameters for nodal size, minimum axial diameter is the most specific dimension for predicting malignancy. Van den Brekel et al recommend a minimum axial diameter of 7 mm for submental/submandibular nodes and 8 mm for other cervical nodes.4 They cite an overall accuracy of 70% when minimum axial diameter is used as a sole diagnostic criterion. If ultrasound examination of a patient with head and neck cancer reveals a lymph node that is increasing in size or new nodes, then these findings should be viewed with a high degree of suspicion.

Malignant lymph nodes are commonly round, while benign nodes tend to have an elliptical shape.5-7 Axis ratios (either short/long or long/short) can be measured, though a visual qualitative assessment is usually sufficient.

The presence of an echogenic hilus within a cervical lymph node reflects preserved sinusoidal architecture and is a good sign for predicting benignity.8,9 The presence of a round node with an absent hilus is highly indicative of malignancy.

A diffusely hypoechoic, or pseudocystic, enlarged lymph node has previously been described as a sign of lymphoma. Newer generation transducers, however, more commonly show a reticulated intranodal pattern.10,11

In patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the presence of necrosis (coagulative and cystic) within an enlarged lymph node is a very strong indicator of malignancy.12 Tuberculous nodes and metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma also tend to undergo cystic degeneration,13 and these may mimic metastatic nodes from SCC. An ill-defined border or frank invasion of neighboring structures can be detected easily with ultrasound and indicates poor prognosis.

On color Doppler imaging, the distribution of vessels within a node is more reliable than various vascular and resistive indices.14 Benign nodes have a central hilar flow pattern, whereas malignant nodes have a disorganized peripheral pattern. Areas of relative avascularity reflect the presence of necrosis and peripheral subcapsular vessels.

The typical small punctate calcification seen in a papillary thyroid carcinoma is also observed in lymph node metastases from papillary carcinoma.18 The sign is specific and should prompt a diligent search for the thyroid primary.

Branchial cleft cyst
Ninety-five percent of all branchial cleft anomalies arise from remnants of second branchial apparatus. Second branchial cleft cysts are most common in children and young adults, and the anatomic location is one of the best clues for diagnosis. These cysts are generally found superficial to the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein, posterior to the submandibular gland, and along the medial and anterior margin of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.
Appearance on ultrasound depends on whether there is any previous infective or hemorrhagic component.19 Most uncomplicated branchial cleft cysts appear as well-circumscribed round/ovoid anechoic masses with thin walls and posterior acoustic enhancement. Some cysts may exhibit a pseudosolid appearance due to the presence of cellular material and cholesterol. Previous episodes of infection or hemorrhage may cause the lesions to appear ill defined and thick walled, with septae and heterogeneous internal echoes (Figure 2). Lesions with this appearance should be differentiated from metastatic lymph nodes. Further evaluation will require ultrasound-guided FNAC.

Thyroglossal duct cyst
This congenital anomaly is related to the thyroglossal duct. Most lesions are anatomically related to the hyoid bone. About 25% to 65% occur in the infrahyoid neck, 15% to 50% occur at the level of the hyoid, and 20% to 25% are suprahyoid. Thyroglossal duct cysts are characteristically located in the midline of the anterior neck above the thyroid cartilage. The cysts are slightly off midline and deep to strap muscles at the level of thyroid cartilage.
Thyroglossal duct cysts typically appear on ultrasound as well-defined thin-walled anechoic cysts with posterior acoustic enhancement. They may have a uniformly pseudosolid echo pattern similar to branchial cleft cysts, owing to proteinaceous content. Previous infection or hemorrhage can result in a heterogeneous appearance.

The role of ultrasound in patients diagnosed clinically with a thyroglossal duct cyst is to confirm diagnosis and the cyst’s relation to the hyoid bone, to detect internal solid components suspicious for malignancy, and to detect the presence of normal thyroid tissue in the neck. If the only functioning thyroid tissue is contained within the thyroglossal duct cyst, then surgery may result in hypothyroidism.20

Lipoma
This benign encapsulated fatty lesion is typically subcutaneous or submucosal in location. About 13% of all lipomas occur in the head and neck. The typical appearance on ultrasound is a well-defined compressible avascular/hypovascular hypoechoic mass with linear echogenic streaks parallel to the transducer

Nerve sheath tumor
Schwannoma and neurofibroma are the most frequently encountered nerve sheath tumors in the head and neck. Common sites in the neck include the vagus nerve, ventral and dorsal cervical nerve roots, cervical sympathetic chain, and brachial plexus. Nerve sheath tumors appear as well-defined solid heterogeneous hypoechoic masses on ultrasound (Figure 5). The presence of a thickened nerve continuous with the mass is the best clue.22 The nerve sheath tumor is typically hypervascular on power Doppler examination.

Venous vascular malformation
Approximately 15% of venous vascular malformations occur in the head and neck region. Malformations appear as well-defined heterogeneous hypoechoic masses on ultrasound. Multiple sinusoidal spaces containing slow-flowing internal echoes are also seen (Figure 6).23 The presence of phleboliths (small echogenic foci with posterior acoustic shadowing), seen in about 20% of cases, essentially confirms diagnosis.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Obstetric Ultrasound

Pregnancy Packages now available!

Patients who come and see us for the dating/viability scan (less than 12 weeks) or the Nuchal Translucency Scan (12-13 weeks) are offered a pregnancy package once there has been a confirmed pregnancy.

Pregnancy Package From Dating/Viability Scan (Less than 12 weeks)

Patients with a Medicare card pay $205 after completion of dating/viability scan and will receive $51 back from Medicare. This means you are out of pocket $154. This entitles the patient to a Bulk Billed Comprehensive Nuchal Translucency Scan (12-13 weeks, 6 days) and Morphology Scan (17-22 weeks).

Pregnancy Package From Nuchal Translucency Scan (12-13 weeks)

Patients with a Medicare card pay $250 after completion of Nuchal Translucency scan and will receive $59.50 back from Medicare. This means you are out of pocket $190.50. We will then bulk bill your Morphology Scan (17-22 weeks).

Inclusions for all Pregnancy Packages

In addition to the above scans, should the patient need any further scans up until 16 weeks for any clinical reason, the patient will then also be bulk billed. This excludes NIPT.

Single Pregnancy Scans can still be performed as required.

A referral for each pregnancy scan is always required.

The above packages include 3D/4D complimentary as normal for our Obstetric scans with online portal accessible for all patients via your mobile or computer where you can download digitial copies of the images or videos (4D).

USB’s available for purchase at an additional cost of $15.00. Prints are also available for an additional cost of $5 for two pages.

For further information, please contact our practice on 55 392 555.

To be certain your NT scan is performed correctly, it is important that you have your scan performed at an accredited practice. A NT computer package was developed by the London Fetal Medicine Foundation in the 1990s and was based on more than 100.000 pregnancies.

There is strict auditing of the NT ultrasound work performed by every accredited practice in the world. This ensures that the NT scan test is being performed correctly. Recently, the Royal Australian College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has taken over regular auditing of Australian practices.

Paradise Ultrasound has passed its audit since opening. The Director, Anna Galea was the first Sonographer to bring the Fetal Medicine Nuchal Translucency program to the Gold Coast and Tweed areas.

Anna has been committed to keeping Paradise Ultrasound Sonographer’s up to date and accredited. Paradise Ultrasound offer Nuchal Translucency risks inclusive of Nasal Bone, Ductus Venous, Intracranial Translucency (spina bifida risk), Pre-Eclampsia Screening and Growth Restriction.

The Nuchal translucency (NT) scan, or ‘12-week scan,’ is an ultrasound performed in the first trimester between 11.5 weeks and 13 weeks, six days. However is best performed at 12 weeks. This scan is combined with a blood test that looks at two specific hormones of pregnancy: the free-Beta hCG and PAPP-A (pregnancy associated plasma protein A). Your doctor will supply a referral to one of the pathology clinics for this. It should be done atleast 3-5 working day prior to the NT appointment. or anytime over 10 weeks gestation.

This combined test is a very accurate non-invasive screening test available to help identify a fetus at risk for Down syndrome as well as other chromosomal abnormalities and some major structural abnormalities. An ultrasound screening test is non-invasive and does not have any side effects or complications.

However, it will not give a yes/no answer to whether a problem such as Down syndrome is present. The only way to diagnose Down syndrome or other chromosomal abnormalities is by having a invasive diagnostic test — either a CVS or an Amniocentesis — and testing the fetal cells. These tests are invasive and require a needle to be passed into the maternal abdomen and uterus and therefore carry a small risk of miscarriage.

Many patients do not wish to have the diagnostic test because of the small risk of miscarriage and prefer to have the ultrasound screening test, the NT scan, to help them decide if they wish to proceed to testing the fetus.

Unfortunately, while NT combined with the first trimester biochemical blood test is a very accurate screening test available for chromosomal and structural abnormalities, it will not detect all fetuses affected with Down syndrome or other chromosomal abnormalities. It is approximately 95% accurate when combining the NT, Nasal Bone, Vuctus Venosus and blood test together.

Advantages of the 12 week NT scan

There are several advantages to undergoing a 12-week NT scan, including:

  • Estimates individual risk for Down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormality
  • Screen for Spina Bifida
  • More accurately date the pregnancy
  • Diagnose multiple fetuses
  • Diagnose early pregnancy failure
  • Allow early detection of some major structural abnormalities
  • Estimate individual risk for Pre-Eclampsia and growth restricted fetus
  • NT and Down syndrome

Chromosomal abnormalities occur when there is a change in the number or structure of the chromosomes. Normally we have 46 chromosomes, 23 pairs numbered 1-22 and a pair of sex chromosomes.

Boys have XY and girls have XX. The most common chromosomal abnormality seen at birth is Down syndrome. In Down syndrome, an extra copy of chromosome 21 is present, giving a total of 47 chromosomes.

When there is extra fluid and the NT measurement is thicker than normal, there is an association with chromosomal anomalies such as Down syndrome and some structural abnormalities in the fetus. Not all babies with an increased NT measurement have Down syndrome or any structural abnormality.

The baby is measured from head to bottom to determine the crown-rump length and the nuchal translucency is measured. Nasal bone and ductus venosus are obtained. These measurements are entered into the computer program with the patient’s date of birth and the first trimester biochemistry blood test. The computer then calculates the patient’s age-related risk for Down syndrome and the new individual risk for this pregnancy.

At Paradise Ultrasound the findings are then discussed with the patient on the day if the blood test results are available. The combined NT result will provide the patient with a risk assessment. This will either be a high risk (risk is greater than 1 in 300) or a low risk (risk less than 1 in 300). As this is a screening test and not a diagnostic test, even with a low calculated risk, Down syndrome is not completely excluded and can still occur occasionally.

PRE-ECLAMPSIA SCREENING

Paradise Ultrasound is pleased to be the first diagnostic imaging group to offer risk assessment for pre-eclampsia on the Gold Coast.

This is performed at the time of the 12 week’s fetal anatomy/ Downs syndrome risk assessment ultrasound, as such, there is no additional cost for pre-eclampsia screening.

Pre-eclampsia is a relatively common complication. It is an illness you can get only during pregnancy (any time after 20 weeks of pregnancy) or up to six weeks after birth. It can affect you and your unborn baby. If it is predicted in time, it can be monitored and treated.

Pre-eclampsia can affect any pregnancy. You are more at risk if:

1. This is your first pregnancy
2. You, your mother or sister had pre-eclampsia
3. You have a BMI (Body mass index) of 35 or more
4. Your age is 49 or over
5. You are expecting twins, triplets or quads
6. You have a medical problem such as high blood pressure, kidney problems and /or diabetes
7. Your pregnancy was medically assisted e.g. IVF

The exact cause of pre-eclampsia is not known, but it is recognised that problems in the placenta are involved. In pre-eclampsia the placenta cannot get as much blood from you as it needs. This affects you and your baby in different ways. In some case women who become effected by pre-eclampsia will be admitted to hospital and in many cases their babies will need to be delivered prematurely.
Preventive care of pre-eclampsia high risk cases aims to prevent or delay the development of pre-eclampsia.

The pregnancy can then safely continue and the baby will have time to develop.
A simple treatment of low doses of aspirin, under the direct care of your doctor, has being proven to be effective. For such treatments to work, they must be initiated before 16 weeks of pregnancy.

When you have a pre-eclampsia screening, the risk factors are combined with your test results so that in most cases the increase risk of pre-eclampsia can be ruled out, giving you peace of mind during your pregnancy. In the event the results return high risk, your doctor will be able to initiate your treatment at the optimum time and monitor your pregnancy more carefully.

3D/4D is included as complimentary in all Obstetric scans at no additional charge.

For more information or to make an appointment, please give us a call on 07 55392 555.

Pre-Eclampsia Screening 11-14 weeks scan
Pre-eclampsia is a condition where irregular placental development causes the mother’s blood pressure to rise after 20 weeks of pregnancy and affects the mother’s kidneys resulting in protein being lost in the urine. It is associated with abnormal placental function, fetal growth restriction and prematurity. Pre-eclampsia affects 2-5% of pregnant women, of whom about 1 in 200 (0.5%) will have a severe form of the disorder arising early and requiring delivery of the baby before 34 weeks gestation. (Jon Hyett: Fetal Medicine, 2013)

The “12 week scan” performed at Paradise Ultrasound now identifies women at an increased risk of evolving early onset, severe pre-eclampsia on the basis of a combination of past or family history of hypertension, biophysical parameters (BMI and mean arterial blood pressure), first trimester sonographic features (Uterine artery Doppler assessment) and maternal serum markers of placental function (PAPP-A +/- placental growth factor). Combination of these parameters in a validated risk algorithm (Fetal Medicine Foundation, London) allows identification in the first trimester of approximately 90% of those women destined to develop pre-eclampsia prior to 34 weeks, with a false positive rate of 10%.

The pre-eclampsia screening process does not require extra blood tests however it requires additional time with your normal first trimester screening. Pre-eclampsia needs to be requested by your referring doctor, and it is necessary to tell the receptionist at Paradise Ultrasound when booking the appointment as this appointment will take at least an hour.

At this scan you will be asked some questions relating to your health and your family, as a family or personal history of high blood pressure will affect your risk estimate. This information will be combined with ultrasound measurements of blood flow in the arteries supplying your uterus, your height, weight and blood pressure, and some information from the blood test used in screening your pregnancy for chromosome abnormality (the PAPP-A level). Using this approach, we can identify approximately 90% of women destined to develop early-onset pre-eclampsia.

Early screening for pre-eclampsia is important because early intervention (before 16 weeks gestation) can reduce the adverse effects for both mother and baby by over 50%. This intervention involves taking a low-dose aspirin tablet (100mg, which is one-third the dose of a normal tablet) on a daily basis until 34 weeks. The preventative effect is not seen if the aspirin is commenced after 16 weeks, as the placental changes have already become established by then. Aspirin is a very safe drug in pregnancy, and can be used by all women other than those who are allergic to this medication or have a stomach ulcer.

Like all screening tests, pre-eclampsia risk assessment is not 100% accurate. Approximately 90% of women who develop early and severe pre-eclampsia will be correctly identified as high risk by the combined test. About 5-10% of women will be considered at high risk but will not develop the condition (this is called a false-positive risk result). These women will still be offered the aspirin intervention and will be monitored a little more closely during the pregnancy. They may develop pre-eclampsia later in the pregnancy but it is usually of a much milder form that has fewer adverse effects for both mother and baby.

The results of the pre-eclampsia screening test will be forwarded to your doctor and you should discuss the treatment and monitoring issues with them. Each woman has different family and personal health factors that contribute to the pregnancy management, and your obstetrician (private or hospital) is best placed to individualize your care.

Your 18-20 week scan looks for abnormalities in your baby’s structural development and growth. It also checks the position of the placenta. It is not a screening test for chromosomal anomalies. The ultrasound scan provides you with an opportunity to see your baby. While this can be a very exciting and emotional time, it is important to remember that this is a medical examination and the main purpose of the scan is to detect structural abnormalities.

The number of babies in the uterus Scan to asses fetal morphology and shows interval growth by fetal measurements, the position of the placenta and the amount of amniotic fluid around baby.

3D/4D is included as complimentary in all Obstetric scans at no additional charge.

For an appointment call 55 392 555.
Drink 500mls of water 1 hour before your appointment.

To check for:
Fetal growth and size
Amount of Amniotic Fluid
Doppler of Blood flow in the cord, brain etc
Fetal well being
Placental location

3D/4D is included as complimentary in all Obstetric scans at no additional charge.
For an appointment call 55 392 555.
Drink 250mls of water 1 hour before your appointment.
Click here for more information

Reassurance Scan at Paradise Ultrasound 

Have you had all your required scans through your pregnancy?
Would you still like to see baby on ultrasound again? The reassurance scan is available to all patients from any gestation to see baby again without a referral.

No formal report is done as the scan is non-diagnostic. No referral is required, and the scan is performed by a qualified Sonographer. The cost for this is $99.

You will need to have all of your required scans done up to date, and we will require copies of these reports before your scan.

For gender determination, a reassurance scan can be performed at 15-16 weeks as long as you’ve had previous formal ultrasounds including your 12-14 week scan.

A general well-being check of baby is performed as well as 3D/4D imaging. The reassurance scan runs for approximately 30 minutes. We will contact your GP or midwife if anything concerning is found.

All images are provided to you at the end of the scan via the patient portal.

Contact us today on 55392555 for more information.

Natera Panorama Prenatal Testing – NIPT

Panorama screens for the most common genetic conditions and the baby’s gender (optional). Some conditions, such as Down syndrome, are caused by extra copies of a specific chromosome. Others, such as microdeletions, occur when a chromosome is missing a small piece of genetic information. Microdeletions affect women equally, regardless of age. The NIPT test can be performed anytime from 9 weeks gestation.

Paradise Ultrasound in conjunction with Natera Panorama offer complimentary bulk billed viability scans prior to the NIPT on site. This confirms that the pregnancy is still viable and there are no visible structural concerns.

We have three options for the NIPT:

Panorama Basic Panel ($420) – Trisomy 18, 13, 21, Triploidy, X&Y.

Panorama Basic Panel Plus ($450) – Trisomy 18, 13, 21, Triploidy, X&Y, +22Q11.2 Test.

Panorama Full Panel ($580) – Trisomy 18, 13, 21, Triploidy, X&Y, plus full microdeletion panel.

DOWNLOAD NIPT FORM
    

3D/4D images of your Baby

As with normal 2D scanning many factors influence what parts of the baby we can see.  These factors include position, the volume of Amniotic fluid and the size of the mother’s abdomen.  The Sonographers will attempt  to obtained  best possible images.

Good 3D/4D images require a co-operative baby and adequate amniotic fluid in front of the structures being imaged.  Some babies press against the wall of the uterus or placenta, or they may have limbs in front of their face. This will make obtaining 3D/4D image.   We aim to obtain good 3D/4D images of the baby’s face but we also think it is more important to make sure that your baby is healthy and growing well.  It is good for parents to anticipate seeing their baby but not to be too disappointed if the ultrasound proves impossible to get these 3D images of the face.

We include 3D/4D imaging complimentary in all obstetric diagnostic scans.

If you are just wanting to come in specifically for 3D/4D imaging and not for clinical reasons, the Reassurance scan may be appropriate for you.

Women's Health

What are the reasons for performing a pelvic ultrasound scan?

  • Pelvic pain.
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
  • Localising an intrauterine device (IUCD).
  • Evaluation of the uterus and endometrium (lining of the womb).
  • Evaluation of the ovaries.
  • Adjunct in fertility treatments
  • Review of early pregnancy for location and dating.
  • Review of a mass palpated during a pelvic examination.
  • Assessment of uterine fibroids.

How is the examination performed?
There are 2 parts to the routine pelvic scan

  1. An initial scan is performed through the abdomen (transabdominal scan) using the full bladder as a window. It provides a broad perspective of the organs in the pelvis but generally not a lot of detail.
  2. A scan through the vagina (transvaginal scan) using a slender probe which provides significantly more detailed images. We routinely perform a transvaginal ultrasound imaging scan of the pelvis, unless you feel this is not appropriate for you or you have never had a pap smear or intercourse.

What preparation do I need on the day of the scan?
You should drink 1 Litre of water one hour prior to your scheduled ultrasound appointment.  You should not empty your bladder after drinking until you have had your scan.  If your bladder becomes uncomfortably full you may empty a small amount but do not empty it completely.  This facilitates imaging of the uterus and pelvic organs during the transabdominal scan.

https://ovariancancer.net.au/

What is a Breast Ultrasound?
Breast Ultrasound is the examination of the breast tissue using an ultrasound scan. Ultrasound uses high frequency sound waves to produce images (or pictures) of the body that are displayed on a screen.

Ultrasound of the breast helps to distinguish fluid filled lumps in the breast (cysts) from solid lumps which may be cancerous or benign (non-cancerous). It is often useful to examine the breasts of younger women because the breast tissue is much denser than it is in older women, and this density can make it harder to detect an abnormality if a mammogram is performed.
Ultrasound is also used to diagnose problems such as complications from mastitis (an infection that occurs most often during breastfeeding), to assess abnormal nipple discharge, to assess problems with breast implants and to guide the placement of a needle during biopsies.

How do I prepare for a Breast Ultrasound?
No preparation is necessary for this examination.
It is advisable to wear a two piece outfit so that only your top has to be removed to provide access to the breast area.

What happens during a Breast Ultrasound?
You will be asked to remove your top and bra and change into a gown.
You will be asked to lie on a bed and one breast at a time will be examined.
A triangular sponge will be placed behind your shoulder so that you are rolled slightly onto your side.  This helps position the breast to make scanning more effective.
Gel is applied to the skin and an ultrasound probe (called a transducer) is placed on the breast and gently moved around the breast to examine the breast tissue.
Examination of the armpit (or axilla) will also be undertaken to assess for any enlarged lymph glands (or nodes – a lump or swelling).

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Vascular Ultrasound

A Carotid Doppler Ultrasound Scan is primarily for assessing the blood flow in the arteries of the neck.

How the Test is Performed
A Carotid Doppler Scan is a special type of ultrasound which is able to show blood flow as a colour-coded dynamic image. The sonographer is able to calculate the velocity of blood flow and to determine the degree of narrowing in the blood vessel, if any.
The test consists of applying a small probe to the side of the neck, near the “Adam’s apple”, using sonographic gel applied to the skin. Mild to moderate pressure may be necessary to obtain detailed images of the carotid arteries.

Medical Conditions and Symptoms
A Carotid Doppler Ultrasound Scan is usually performed to assess the risk of stroke in a patient with episodes suggestive of cerebro-vascular disease, such as a Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA) – also known as a mini-stroke. A TIA is caused by a small clot temporarily blocking off an area of blood supply in the brain. This may result in a range of sensory symptoms, such as numbness, tingling, or altered sensation, or motor symptoms – weakness of the face, arm or leg, commonly on one side of the body. A clot in any blood vessel supplying the posterior part of the brain, the cerebellum, may cause unsteadiness, clumsiness, slurred speech or even loss of consciousness. This is known as a Posterior-Circulation TIA.
If the clot is dissolved by the body’s natural processes within a few minutes, blood flow returns to the affected area of the brain, and function returns to normal. Otherwise, there may be varying degrees of residual symptoms, with variable rates of recovery, right up to a completed infarction – a “full-blown” stroke.
The carotid arteries in the neck are a common source of small clots, especially if there is a narrowing of the blood vessel due to atherosclerosis, known as a carotid artery stenosis. This narrowing may be detected by your doctor as a carotid bruit – a whooshing noise due to turbulent flow, heard with a stethoscope placed on the side of the neck, over the carotid artery.

Test Results Explained
The Carotid Doppler Ultrasound Scan may be reported as normal, meaning normal blood flow and no evidence of carotid stenosis (narrowing).
When there is some narrowing of the vessel, this usually reported in terms of a percentage, for example “70% stenosis”.
With stenosis over 75%, your doctor may refer you to a Vascular Surgeon for consideration of surgery to correct the narrowing, known as a Carotid EndArterectomy (CEA). Lesser degrees of stenosis are usually treated with a daily low dose of aspirin to decrease the likelihood of clot formation.

The renal artery ultrasound is a non-invasive method of checking the arteries that supply blood to your
kidneys. Your doctor has requested this examination because you may have one or more of the following presentations:

high blood pressure that has been difficult to
control with routine medication
deterioration in the function of your kidneys
an abnormal blood test
previously diagnosed narrowing (stenosis) or
blockage in one or both renal arteries
previous surgical or endovascular treatment for renal artery
Procedure
Because the arteries in your abdomen lie underneath the large intestine (bowel), dietary preparation is
required for this examination. The purpose of this is to reduce gases that form in the bowel and which can interfere with adequate ultrasound penetration. This preparation will be explained to you in more detail when you are making your appointment and will vary depending on whether or not you have diabetes. The renal artery ultrasound scan is performed with you lying on an examination couch so you should be quite comfortable. In order for the sonographer to easily access the abdominal arteries, you will be asked to remove your footwear, and the outer clothing from your waist down. The sonographer will ask you for a short medical history, including what blood pressure medications you may be taking. Gel will be placed on your skin and you will feel the firm pressure from the transducer as it runs along the course of the blood vessels, but there should be no major discomfort. You may be required to roll a little from side to side, so better views of the arteries can be obtained. If you do have any questions or concerns, please ask at any time throughout the test.

Preparation
Drink 500mL of water one hour before the scan to improve blood flow to the kidneys, however there is no need for you to have a full bladder.

How long does the examination take?
1 hour 15 minutes

This examination may be unilateral or bilateral, and will always include examination of the aorta and iliac arteries

Indications
Claudication, rest pain, ulceration, ischemic changes, evaluation of aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm, follow-up of surgical or interventional procedures.

Preparation
For one leg there is no preparation required.

Bilateral legs you will need to fast for 6 hours before the examination. You will need to get the legs done seperately for medicare reasons.

This examination may be performed on its own, or in conjunction with a unilateral or bilateral lower limb duplex examination, depending on the specific clinical history.

Indications
Abdominal bruit, evaluation of aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm, evaluation of inflow of peripheral vascular disease, follow-up of surgical or interventional procedures

Patient Preparation
Fast for 6 hours prior to examination.

Interventional Procedures

Breast Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA)
A Breast Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) is a quick and simple procedure to perform, which removes some fluid or cells from a breast lesion or cyst (a lump, sore or swelling) with a fine needle similar to a blood sample needle. The sample of fluid or cells is smeared on a glass slide and sent to a pathology laboratory to be examined by a specialist doctor (a cytologist) under a microscope. An FNA is performed to help determine the nature or diagnosis of the lesion and to plan treatment if necessary.

Breast FNA may also be used to aspirate a cyst (that is, using the needle to draw fluid from the cyst) to remove it completely or relieve discomfort if the cyst is large and tender. This will performed with the guidance of ultrasound.

How do I prepare for a Breast FNA?

There is no need for special preparation before a Breast FNA. Breast FNA can be done immediately after you have had a medical examination and any imaging your doctor may have referred you for, such as a mammogram and/or ultrasound to find out the cause of the lesion. Wear a comfortable two piece outfit, as you will need to have the upper body undressed for the Breast FNA.

Procedure

You will be lying on your back on the examination bed in the ultrasound room, the upper body undressed, with one arm above your head on the pillow in a comfortable position. The doctor will put a clear gel on your breast and the ultrasound transducer or probe (see Ultrasound) will be slowly moved across the breast to show and identify the lesion on the ultrasound screen. The doctor will clean your breast with an antiseptic liquid and place the needle through the skin and into the lesion guided by the ultrasound images.

Local anaesthetic on the skin area where the needle is inserted is sometimes given. If the doctor does not provide anaesthetic you can ask about this before the needle is inserted.

When the needle is inserted into the lesion, the doctor will make several small (less than 1 cm) forward and backward, gentle movements with the needle to collect cells or, if the lesion is a cyst, fluid may be collected. Two or three separate samples are usually taken in this way to ensure a good sample has been obtained.

What are the risk?

Minor complications include some brusing or bleeding at the time of aspiration. The more serious complications are haematoma (collection of blood) or infection at the site. If the lesion is very deep in the breast the need could penetrate beyond the breast tissue and reach the lung and cause an air leak. This leakage of air may be very minor and require no treatment. If the leakage of air is considerable a tube may have to be placed within the chest to drain the accumulated air. In the latter case, you may need to be hospitalised to monitor your treatment. In actual practise these are extremely rare complications and have to be balanced against the risk of missing a breast cancer.

Breast Core Biopsy
A Breast Core Biopsy is where a special needle (or probe) is inserted into the breast to take a small sample of breast tissue from an area of concern so that it can be sent to a laboratory for testing. It is done using local anaesthetic to numb the breast in the area that is being biopsied. An abnormality may have been identified on a ultrasound or X-ray image or may have been felt as a lump.

How do I prepare for a Breast Core Biopsy

Generally no preparation is needed. You should bring any recent breast imaging (mammograms and/or ultrasounds) and reports for the doctor performing the procedure to review before doing the biopsy.

Do not wear talcum powder or deodorant on the day of the biopsy as these can mimic or imitate calcium spots in the breast which makes it harder for the radiologist to identify the abnormality that requires biopsy. You might consider the clothes you wear on the day so you only need to remove clothes from the upper part of your body.

Procedure

The skin of the breast is washed with antiseptic and then a very fine needle is used to give local anaesthetic to numb the breast in the area for biopsy. The local anaesthetic stings for only a few seconds when it is being given, and after this the area will be numb.

A small nick or cut is made in the skin and the biopsy needle is gently inserted into the breast. Several samples are taken. When each sample is taken there is a clicking noise, and you may have a feeling of pressure in the breast where the sample is taken. The biopsy procedure may sometimes feel uncomfortable but is not usually painful because of the local anaesthetic that has been given.

After the samples have been taken, the biopsy area will be pressed on firmly for a few minutes to reduce bruising and bleeding, and then covered with a dressing

What are the risks of a Breast Core Biopsy?

You will usually have some bruising at the biopsy site and sometimes this may take several weeks to disappear.

There is a very small risk of infection. In the very unlikely event that the biopsy site becomes infected, a course of antibiotics may be required from your doctor.

Contact your doctor if you experience excessive swelling, bleeding, have fluid draining from the wound, redness or heat in the breast after the biopsy.

Doing a biopsy of tissue, especially if it is located deep within the breast, carries a slight risk that the needle (or probe) will pass through the chest wall, allowing air around the lung that could collapse a lung. This complication is a rare occurrence and is called a pneumothorax.

Breast Core Biopsy
A Breast Core Biopsy is where a special needle (or probe) is inserted into the breast to take a small sample of breast tissue from an area of concern so that it can be sent to a laboratory for testing. It is done using local anaesthetic to numb the breast in the area that is being biopsied. An abnormality may have been identified on a ultrasound or X-ray image or may have been felt as a lump.

How do I prepare for a Breast Core Biopsy

Generally no preparation is needed. You should bring any recent breast imaging (mammograms and/or ultrasounds) and reports for the doctor performing the procedure to review before doing the biopsy.

Do not wear talcum powder or deodorant on the day of the biopsy as these can mimic or imitate calcium spots in the breast which makes it harder for the radiologist to identify the abnormality that requires biopsy. You might consider the clothes you wear on the day so you only need to remove clothes from the upper part of your body.

Procedure

The skin of the breast is washed with antiseptic and then a very fine needle is used to give local anaesthetic to numb the breast in the area for biopsy. The local anaesthetic stings for only a few seconds when it is being given, and after this the area will be numb.

A small nick or cut is made in the skin and the biopsy needle is gently inserted into the breast. Several samples are taken. When each sample is taken there is a clicking noise, and you may have a feeling of pressure in the breast where the sample is taken. The biopsy procedure may sometimes feel uncomfortable but is not usually painful because of the local anaesthetic that has been given.

After the samples have been taken, the biopsy area will be pressed on firmly for a few minutes to reduce bruising and bleeding, and then covered with a dressing

What are the risks of a Breast Core Biopsy?

You will usually have some bruising at the biopsy site and sometimes this may take several weeks to disappear.

There is a very small risk of infection. In the very unlikely event that the biopsy site becomes infected, a course of antibiotics may be required from your doctor.

Contact your doctor if you experience excessive swelling, bleeding, have fluid draining from the wound, redness or heat in the breast after the biopsy.

Doing a biopsy of tissue, especially if it is located deep within the breast, carries a slight risk that the needle (or probe) will pass through the chest wall, allowing air around the lung that could collapse a lung. This complication is a rare occurrence and is called a pneumothorax.

A common cause of a painful joint is synovitis (inflammation of the lining of the joint). It can be useful to inject corticosteroid and/or local anaesthetic medication directly into the joint or the soft tissue next to a joint (this is often called a bursa) to reduce the inflammation and provide pain relief. Reduction in pain may make physical therapy more effective. This procedure is most often used in the shoulder, knee, or hip but may also be helpful in other joints.

To make sure the injection goes into the joint itself where it has a better chance of working, the needle for the injection is guided by ultrasound.

How do I prepare for a Steriod Injection?
Prior to your appointment: You don’t need to do anything special before a joint injection. You may eat and drink as normal.

On the day of your appointment: Please bring any previous Ultrasound, X-rays, CT or MRI scans taken as part of your joint pain history.

Please tell the radiologist if you are allergic to any medications.

Procedure
The Steriod Injection is most commonly performed using ultrasound to guide the injection. The exact technique varies depending on the joint to be injected and the radiologist (specialist doctor) who performs the injection. Generally a preliminary scan will be performed to locate the exact point to be injected, which may be marked on your skin. The skin will then be cleaned with an antiseptic solution to prevent infection. A needle will then be placed into the joint either at the point marked on your skin or using the ultrasound to see the tip of the needle as it moves into the joint or bursa. Sometimes the radiologist may remove some fluid from the joint for analysis before injecting usually a mix of steroid and/or local anaesthetic into the joint or bursa.

Are there any risks of a Steriod Injection?
There is a risk of infection, which is very small and probably lies between 1 in 20,000 and 1 in 75,000 injections performed. The procedure should not be performed if there is broken skin or infection overlying the joint, or if the joint may already be infected.

There are possible complications of the steroid injection, which include aggravation of the pain due to irritation of the joint lining by crystals in the steroid solution.

If the steroid is not injected solely into the joint, there is a risk of damage to the soft tissues at the injection site, including atrophy (a weakening) of the skin or subcutaneous fat (found just beneath the skin) and rupture of the tendons around the joint. Some patients find that the injection gives them good pain relief for a few months, but then the pain comes back and they wonder about having another injection. Although the exact risk of multiple injections is not known, most doctors would advise against injection more than 3-4 times a year to avoid damage to the joint. Occasionally people are allergic to the injected medication (as with any drug). The exact risk of this is not known but it seems to be very uncommon. You should advise your doctor and the radiologist performing the Joint Injection of any allergies you may have.

Ultrasound guided percutaneous drainage is one form of image guided procedure, allowing minimally invasive treatment of collections that are accessible by ultrasound study.

Advantages
Is a dynamic study, allowing greater precision to control needle insertion
Not exposes patient to ionising radiation
Does not require as wide a range of staff, compared to CT-guided procedure
Indications
Indications for percutaneous drainage are broad: essentially any abnormal fluid collection in the patient which can be accessible. Examples include:

post-surgical fluid collections
Asutes

Echocardiogram and Holters

Echocardiogram
An Echocardiogram is a non-invasive diagnostic procedure that uses ultrasound to study to structure and motions of the heart. This provides your doctor with moving images of your heart using ultrasound technology to study your heart anatomy and its function to help your doctor evaluate your heart health.

At Paradise Ultrasound we have a specialised staff to perform this study. Mathew and the CardioNexus team are a co-operative of cardiac ultrasound specialists providing quality Echocardiography services throughout South East Queensland. Focusing primarily on echocardiography, all members of the team are Cardiac Scientist trained at The Prince Charles Hospital in Brisbane.

A cardiac Sonographer is specially trained and will use an ultrasound transducer on your chest to look at your heart through the chest wall and your rib cage. There is no radiation involved with an echocardiogram and it can be performed on patients from 4 years and older.

Screening for children, is for ASD, VSD, Murmurs, Failure to thrive and Lethargy.

An Echocardiogram is performed when patients have unexplained chest or upper arm pains, heart murmurs, minor heart attacks, heart defects or a history of heart disease, as well as patients who are undergoing complex non cardiac surgery or chemotherapy.

There is no preparation required for an echocardiogram. There is no restriction on eating or drinking, and you should continue to do so as you normally would. If you take medication, you should continue to take them as normal unless your doctor specifies otherwise. The study will take between half an hour to forty-five minutes.

If you have had any other previous echocardiograms or related scans please bring these reports along with you to your appointment.

24 Holster Monitor
If you have

  • Palpitations
  • Dizziness
  • Chest pain
  • Breathlessness
  • Syncope and pre syncope
  • Complications e.g. CVA or embolic episode
  • Need to rule out…Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, significant pauses, AV Block
  • Ventricular and supraventricular trachy-Arrhythmias
  • People who have being treated for heart
  • problems use Holter monitors to show how treatment is working

The Holter compliments the need for Echo cardiography (Structural Assessment)

This examination is bulk billed at Paradise Ultrasound.

Give our lovely receptionist a call on 55 392 555 for an appointment.

24 Holster Monitor
If you have

Palpitations
Dizziness
Chest pain
Breathlessness
Syncope and pre syncope
Complications e.g. CVA or embolic episode
Need to rule out…Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, significant pauses, AV Block
Ventricular and supraventricular trachy-Arrhythmias
• People who have being treated for heart rhythm problems use Holter monitors to show how treatment is working

The Holter compliments the need for Echo cardiography (Structural Assessment)

This examination is bulk billed at Paradise Ultrasound.

Give our lovely receptionist a call on 55 392 555 for an appointment.

Paediatric Ultrasound

At Paradise Ultrasound Specialists, our Paetricitian provides comprehensive ultrasound imaging services for paediatric patients.

Services we offer:
Abdomen
Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis
Scrotum
Neck
Hip
Knee

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.

Contact our friendly staff on (07) 55 392 555 for more info.






    How can we help you?

    Should you have any questions, feel free to contact us or call us with a referral (07) 55 392 555 to book an appointment. 

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